Bjork’s Extra-Terrestrial Style




The fashions of the Icelandic performer are controversial to some, but there’s no denying the visual impact of her extra-terrestrial costuming.

Björk began her career as a singer at age 16 in what is known as “kinderwhore,” a look that consists of feminine undergarments torn and paired with hard elements like leather boots and smudged makeup. As she grew into success with her band The Sugarcubes, she developed a sweet, feminine style. But then as she ventured on her own, the singer styled herself in the innovative costumes that we recognize today.

Favoring the avant-garde mixed with alien-esque shapes and feminine styling, Björk’s fashions have been as influential as the music she creates. At the 2001 Academy Awards, the singer stunned the public in a dying swan dress by Marjan Pejoski that became infamous in fashion history.

Outside of a dying swan, Björk’s fashion journey took on when she began to work with British designer Alexander McQueen in 1997. Their first collaboration was for her Homogenic album cover, a manipulated image that includes cultural items like a kimono and neck-lengthening neck bands paired with space-age hair buns. They continued to work together, with moments including a bell-covered dress for her music video “Who Is it?” and appearing on the red carpet with the designer in a pearl-covered face mask and dropped-shoulder feather skirt gown. She even wore a grand swan dress while performing at McQueen’s star-studded funeral.

Björk’s fashion choices have become so impactful that the Museum of Modern Art exhibited, Björk, a retrospective of the singer’s career that featured many of her outer-world costumes.

For her most recent performances, the singer sported a threeASFOUR mixed media dress paired with an embroidered facemask. And as she continues her career journey, the one thing to expect from the singer is the unexpected.

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