The Glamorous Style of Candy Darling

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Candy Darling was a Warhol Superstar who led a life of parties, men, and disappointments, but the one constant in her life was style. Even on her deathbed, Darling stayed true to who she was, a Hollywood glamour puss.

Born in Long Island in 1944, Darling spent her childhood idolizing Hollywood. In this world, she learned about glamour, which exuded from the fabulous women on her screen. From then and there, she wanted to become a famous actress.

Darling’s love for cinema may have also been a form of escapism from her less than charming childhood. Darling was an only child of divorced parents who was often bullied; a group of boys once attempted to lynch her when she was 16, which caused her to drop out of high school.

Although she was born a male named Jimmy, she identified as a female. It was only her outside appearance that appeared masculine. In order to embrace, and be accepted, for her true self was a difficult task for anyone in the conservative suburbs of Long Island during the 1940s and 1950s.

Darling often escaped this world for the excitement of local gay bars or the Manhattan LGBTQIA scene. There she could be herself, dressed to the nines as a woman. It was during one of these trips that Darling’s mother spotted her in public and confronted her when she arrived home, who was then back in her boy drag. Darling instructed her mother to sit at the kitchen table while she went to change into her evening attire. Her mother later said to a friend, “I knew then… that I couldn’t stop Jimmy. Candy was just too beautiful and talented.”

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Darling’s acting aspirations took off when she met Andy Warhol. Attracted to her outgoing personality and beauty, Warhol saw her potential as a star. How could he not? She was the living embodiment of Marilyn Monroe, Joan Bennet, and Jean Harlow all in one.

As a Warhol Superstar, Darling’s personal aesthetic was a combination of Hollywood nostalgia and 1970s bohemian. She blended prints with furs and lace, and because of her tall frame, she never veered into tacky territory. She accessorized these looks with platinum hair, patterned headscarves, and kohl-rimmed eyes.

At the young age of 29, Darling died of lymphoma. Her funeral was a star-studded event with Gloria Swanson saluting the coffin. While in the hospital, Peter Hujar created the famous photo series “Candy Darling on her Deathbed,” which documented the actress in the hospital. Although extremely sick, she still looked like a movie star.

Candy was both brave and brilliant by just being herself. She once said, “There is one thing I must tell you because I just found it to be a truth …You must always be yourself no matter what the price. It is the highest form of morality.”

To learn more about Candy Darling, check out the 2010 documentary, Beautiful Darling.

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Jane Holzer’s Art Scene Style

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When thinking about a Warhol Star, Edie Sedgwick almost always comes to mind. However, there was another girl about town that shined in Andy Warhol’s eye. Meet Jane Holzer.

Recognized for her swoosh of blonde hair and on-trend style, Jane Holzer is a well-known socialite both on and off the New York art scene. Vogue editor Diana Vreeland once dubbed her, “The most contemporary girl I know.”

Born into a wealthy family, Jane entered fashion society in 1963 as a cover model for British Vogue. Sometime during this period, she met Andy Warhol.

Jane appealed to Warhol because of her hip beauty and wealthy connections. Her work with Warhol consisted of performing in a number of his art films, including the iconic “Screen Test,” which filmed Jane brushing her teeth for over four minutes.

After shooting multiple films with Warhol, Jane left The Factory “between Edie’s arrival and when Andy got shot.” Although she has been affiliated with Warhol, Jane isn’t remembered for the extensive drug use and partying that plagued The Factory. She still had an amicable relationship with Warhol until his 1987 death. In 2014, the Norton Museum of Art held the exhibition “To Jane, Love Andy: Warhol’s First Superstar,” that displayed works of art, fashion, and photography of Jane.

Some may identify her with the name Baby Jane, which is a reference to the 1962 film “Whatever Happened To Baby Jane?” It was columnist Carol Bjorkman who gave her the moniker, but for no apparent reason. When asked about her opinion of the nickname, Jane has stated that she “wanted to die” after hearing it.

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Jane Holzer’s Clothing via The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Jane’s style in the 1960s was rock n’ roll on 5th Avenue; it was au courant without excessive embellishments. She mixed classic with sexy by wearing a micro mini dress that covered up to her neck or a long-sleeved bodysuit with a revealing back. When paired with her gravity-defying hair and cat-eye makeup, Jane was a striking figure.

Today, Jane continues to sport her signature blonde mane and now wears loose, bohemian gowns. She is still present on the New York art scene and makes a living as a movie producer. Jane has even been seen on the short-lived reality show “Gallery Girls” as a listening ear to socialites in the New York art scene. Although The Factory’s party has ended, it appears Jane’s is still going strong.